Islam, islamic studies, social sciences, religious studies, interdisciplinary studies, islamic law, islamic economic, islamic education, islamic worldview,

Author Guidelines

Journal Template

Submission of Papers

  1. Papers must deal with issues related to, or relevant with, Islamic Studies, specifically framed or approached with an interdisciplinary perspective. Papers concerned with Islamic studies in general, however, will be considered too.
  2. Papers should be written in English or Arabic, and the text must be grammatically correct and in a good literary style.
  3. Papers must be typed on an A4 size paper in 1,5 space, numbered consecutively, and complete, including all notes, bibliographical references, and tables.
  4. Papers length is about 4500-7000 words.
  5. Papers should include an abstract of not more than 150-200 words that clearly define the thesis and quoted sources.
  6. The full name(s) of the author(s) must be stated, along with his/her/their institution and complete email.
  7. Bibliographical reference must be noted in footnote and bibliography according to IJIIS style. Full information is provided for a footnote in IJIIS Style: full names(s) of the author(s), the title of the source in italic, place of publication, publishing company, year of publication, and the precise page that is cited.
  8. The list of bibliographies must be sorted in alphabetical order.
  9. Arabic words should be transliterated according to IJIIS style of Arabic Transliteration; please insert every symbol of transliterated Arabic letter as a proper Unicode character symbol.
  10. Papers written in Arabic must be accompanied by footnote and bibliography in English with an Arabic transliteration.
  11. Contributions should be original work, which has neither been simultaneously submitted to other journals nor previously published.

 

 Example of Footnote Style 

  1. Ahmed T. Kuru, Secularism, and State Policies toward Religion: The United States, France, and Turkey (New York, Cambridge University Press, 2009), p. 17.
  2. Abdulkader Tayob, Religion in Modern Islamic Discourse (New York: Columbia University Press, 2009), p. 3.
  3. Bernard Lewis, The Political Language of Islam (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991), p. 2-3. See also his “Islam and Liberal Democracy: A Historical Overview,” Journal of Democracy, Vol. 7, No. 2 (1996), pp. 52-63
  4. Ibid, p. 78.
  5. Olivier Roy, Globalised Islam: The Search for a New Ummah (London: Hurst, 2004), p. 9.
  6. Ibid, pp. 11-15.
  7. Fred Halliday, Islam, and the Myth of Confrontation (London: Tauris, 1996), p. 119.
  8. Alfred Stepan, “Religion, Democracy, and the “Twin Tolerations,” Journal of Democracy, Vol. 11, No. 4 (October 2000), p. 44.
  9. Abdolkarim Soroush, “The Changeable and the Unchangeable,” in Kari Vogt, Lena Larsen and Christian Moe (eds.), New Directions in Islamic Thought: Exploring Reform and Muslim Tradition (London, New York: I.B Tauris, 2009), p. 14.
  10. Ira Lapidus, “The Separation of State and Religion in the Development of Early Islamic Society,” International Journal of Middle East, Vol. 6, No. 4 (1975), pp. 363-85.
  11. Olivier Roy, Secularism Confronts Islam (New York: Columbia University Press, 2007), p. 50.
  12. Said Amir Arjoman, “Religious Human Rights and the Principle of Legal Pluralism in the Middle East,” in Johan D. Var der Vyver and John Witte Jr., (eds.), Religious Human Rights in Global Perspective: Legal Perspective (The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1997), p. 334.
  13. Richard Mohr and Nadirsyah Hosen, “Introduction, De capo: law and religion from the top down,” in Nadirsyah Hosen and Richard Mohr (eds.), Law and Religion in Public Life (London and New York: Routledge, 2011), p. 6.
  14. John Anderson, “Does God Matter, and If So Whose God?: Religion and Democratization,” Democratization, Vol. 11, No. 4 (2004), p. 207.
  15. John Rawls, Political Liberalism (New York: Columbia University Press, 1993), p. 9.
  16. Andrew F. March, “Are Secularism and Neutrality Attractive to Religious Minorities? Islamic Discussions of Western Secularism in the “Jurisprudence of Muslim Minorities” (Fiqh Al-Aqalliyyat) Discourse, Cardozo Law Review, Vol. 30, No. 6 (2009), p. 2821.
  17. Abdullahi A. An-Na’im, ‘The Politics of Religion and the Morality of Globalization,’ in Mark Juergensmeyer (ed), Religion in Global Civil Society (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005), 30.
  18. Anīs Manshūr al-Manshūr, Syarh Ahkām Qanūn al-Bayināt al-Urdunī (Aman: Dār Ithrā’, 2013), pp. 318-319.
  19. Abū Hamīd al-Ghazālī, al-Mostashfā fī ‘Ilm al-Ushūl (Beirut: Muassasah at-Tārīkh al-‘Arabī, 1414), 406.

 

 Example of Bibliography

Al-Ghazālī, Abū Hamīd, al-Mustashfā fī ‘Ilm al-Ushūl, Beirut: Muassasah at-Tārīkh al-‘Arabī,  1414 H.

Al-Manshūr, Anīs Manshūr, Syarh Ahkām Qanūn al-Bayināt al-Urdunī, Aman: Dār Ithrā’, 2013.

Anderson, John,  “Does God Matter, and If So Whose God?: Religion and Democratization,” Democratization, Vol. 11, No. 4, 2004.

An-Na’im, Abdullahi A, “The Politics of Religion and the Morality of Globalization,” in Mark Juergensmeyer (ed), Religion in Global Civil Society, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Arjoman, Said, Amir. “Religious Human Rights and the Principle of Legal Pluralism in the Middle East,” in Johan D. Var der Vyver and John Witte Jr., (eds.), Religious Human Rights in Global Perspective: Legal Perspective, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1997.

Halliday, Fred, Islam, and the Myth of Confrontation, London: Tauris, 1996.

Kuru, Ahmed T, Secularism and State Policies toward Religion: The United States, France, and Turkey, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009.

Lapidus, Ira. “The Separation of State and Religion in the Development of Early Islamic Society,” International Journal of Middle East, Vol. 6, No. 4, 1975.

Lewis, Bernard, The Political Language of Islam, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991.

March, Andrew F, “Are Secularism and Neutrality Attractive to Religious Minorities? Islamic Discussions of Western Secularism in the “Jurisprudence of Muslim Minorities” (Fiqh Al-Aqalliyyat) Discourse, Cardozo Law Review, Vol. 30, No. 6, 2009.

Mohr, Richard, and Nadirsyah Hosen, “Introduction, De capo: law and religion from the top down,” in Nadirsyah Hosen and Richard Mohr (eds.), Law and Religion in Public Life, London and New York: Routledge, 2011.

Rawls, John, Political Liberalism, New York: Columbia University Press, 1993.

Roy, Olivier, Globalised Islam: The Search for a New Ummah, London: Hurst, 2004.

___________, Secularism Confronts Islam, New York: Columbia University Press, 2007.

Soroush, Abdolkarim, “The Changeable and the Unchangeable,” in Kari Vogt, Lena Larsen and Christian Moe (eds.), New Directions in Islamic Thought: Exploring Reform and Muslim Tradition, London, New York: I.B Tauris, 2009.

Stepan, Alfred, “Religion, Democracy, and the “Twin Tolerations,” Journal of Democracy, Vol. 11, No. 4, 2000.

Tayob, Abdulkader,  Religion in Modern Islamic Discourse, New York: Columbia University Press, 2009.

 

Copyright

The publication of material in the journal means that the author assigns copyright to IJIIS. However, authors may use their material in other publications acknowledging IJIIS as the original place of publication. Requests by third parties for permission to reprint should be addressed to the editor of this journal.

 

Arabic Transliteration Guidelines

The transliteration system of Arabic words and names applied in this journal is used by the Library of Congress, with some modifications.